My Journey From Pakistani Muslim to Jerusalemite Jew

It was May when the pair first met after being introduced through the dating app The League , which screens applicants and is aimed at young, successful, educated professionals. Khan, 33, is originally from Karachi, Pakistan. Cordova, 34, was raised in Seattle. He moved to San Francisco in June and is business development manager for NRG Worldwide, which develops power plants for hospitals and universities. Before their fourth date, Khan said she wanted to break in her new hiking boots for a gorilla-tracking trip she was taking to Tanzania with her best friend. They stayed in touch during her two weeks in Tanzania and both realized how much they missed each other. As soon as Khan returned, they became a couple. It was on a camping trip soon after to Desolation Wilderness near Lake Tahoe — her first time camping — that they both thought this might be it. Each of us saw how we work together really well.

Interfaith marriage in Islam

A new social storm burst out in the country following the wedding of a Muslim Arab woman and a Jewish man. The Hebrew-language media is full of commentary about it , from condemnations steeped in racist epithets reminiscent of dark periods in history, to hearty congratulatory wishes to the new couple that has exited the closet of anonymity to enter the world of matrimony with bells and whistles.

To really understand Israel and the Middle East – subscribe to Haaretz. A few months ago Tunisian President Bejin Caid Essebsi threw a reverberating social bomb in the Arab world by proposing to revoke constitutional laws that discriminate against women, and replace them with laws that confer full equality between men and women. Among his proposals was an amendment to permit a Muslim woman to wed a non-Muslim man. As we know, all Arab and Muslim countries forbid marriages between Muslim women and men of other faiths.

I am aware that Muslim women are not allowed to marry anyone but a Muslim man. In the Qura’n ‘AL BAQARA’ # ‘ Forbids marriage from polytheists for both​.

Their ceremony was what could only be considered unofficial in Israel, at the beach in Hadera. This is because Israeli law does not permit interfaith marriage. The option left to such couples is to conduct an unofficial ceremony in Israel, but do the actual official marriage in another country, where this then gets retroactively recognized by the state. Aharish and Halevy have held the relationship under the radar for some three years, to avoid the backlash — which surely came.

Various politicians from the right condemned and bemoaned the marriage. Minister of Interior Arye Deri said :. Bro, snap out of it. No more assimilation. In she told the Times of Israel:.

Israel’s Religiously Divided Society

A s a pasty white child raised Muslim in America, I have distant memories of sitting in the school cafeteria with my non-Muslim friends, and just watching them eat. As I fasted from sunup to sundown during the month of Ramadan — not even allowed to drink water — the smells of french fries and grilled cheese would tempt me, over and over, to abandon God and just eat. I was a good American who looked exactly like my friends but, for some reason, I was starving myself.

My mom was one of ten children in a Catholic household that moved from military base to military base throughout her childhood. Her parents, hard-working and hard-drinking, made a regimented and disciplined life for their children.

LISTEN to episode 17 as Annum and Jordan discuss how they make their interfaith Jewish Muslim relationship work.

When arranged marriages were common practice, it was background and families that brought couples together. In the modern day however, it is the spark of passion that ignites most relationships. In order to make a relationship succeed, both partners have to constantly work together. The two of us met in college and we were in the same classes together. We realized very early that our two backgrounds, probably the most diverse you could come up with—an Italian Jew and a Pakistani Muslim—made our viewpoints very different.

In the early stages of our relationship, we faced a lot of negativity from close friends and relatives, but some very strong force kept our relationship together. By introducing each other to a new world of thought, we both became very open-minded. We started seeing the overwhelming similarities of our two religions and how silly some of the conflicts that arise between Muslims and Jews truly are.

Muslims and Jews Break Bread, and Build Bonds

On a blustery weekend this past February, 26 people met at the Cenacle Retreat House in Chicago to reflect on the religious dimensions of marriage. Nothing unusual about that. What was unusual about this gathering was that it brought together Christians and Muslims who are married, engaged or seriously considering marriage. Attendees hailed mostly from the Chicago area, but also from Valparaiso, Minneapolis, Rochester, Minn.

But many may not realize how prevalent it is among Catholics.

Muslim women wishing to marry Christian men face the additional worry of potential ostracism from the faith community, for although Islam.

The series describes, with tart precision and irony, the lives of young American Muslims who may drink, have sex, and believe in God—and who keep much of their lives secret from their parents and their friends. Youssef plays the title character, Ramy, who is unclear about what type of Muslim he is or ought to be. He dates non-Muslim women but hides his religion. Put off less by his beliefs than by his deceit, she walks away. In response, he decides to try dating Muslim women, and he asks his parents to set him up.

Ramy displays a catalogue of misguided assumptions about not only his parents but other Egyptians and Muslims. Toward the end of the series, Ramy decides to go to Egypt to figure himself out. It is his first trip there in fifteen years, and his pre-formed view of Egypt is shattered the minute he lands.

I Married a Jew

It goes without saying that the marriage of a Muslim woman to a non-Muslim man is one of the main taboo issues in debates on Islam. It is absolutely the main verse that states a provision on marriage with a category of non-Muslims. These invite to the Fire, and Allah invites to the Garden and to forgiveness by His grace, and makes clear His revelations to mankind so that they may remember.

It is also worth reminding that polytheists were belonging to an aristocratic class of obscene wealth and indecent conduct, and whose lifestyle was reconsidered by the new social values of fairness and equity of Islam. The verse seems to urge Muslim men and women to choose the modest believing slaves over the rich arrogant polytheists even if the latter would look more attractive than the poor slaves. By getting married to slaves regardless of their social hardship, Islam encouraged Muslims to value people on other basis than their social class, and henceforth; find a balance between the differences established by the ethnic-tribal system at that time.

Islam, on the other hand, is arguably patrilineal. For this reason, it is far less controversial for a Muslim man to marry a Jewish or Christian woman.

The religious landscape of Western Europe is changing. The Christian population is declining , while the share of religiously unaffiliated adults is increasing. The Muslim population is growing as a result of immigration and higher fertility rates. Meanwhile, the Jewish population appears to be on the decline due to emigration to Israel and other factors. Against this backdrop, Pew Research Center asked people in 15 Western European countries a number of questions related to multiculturalism and pluralism, with a specific emphasis on their attitudes toward Muslims and Jews.

These questions were part of a broader study on religion and identity in the region. We asked respondents about their willingness to accept Muslims and Jews as neighbors and relatives. Another set of questions asked people if they agree or disagree with a number of strongly worded statements about Jews and Muslims. When looking at the results, readers should keep a few things in mind. Survey respondents may harbor negative feelings toward Muslims and Jews, but not express them to an interviewer.

Others may express negative feelings, but not have the opportunity or inclination to act in a hostile way toward Muslims and Jews living in their midst.

Why this poster of a Jewish man and a Muslim woman kissing caused a scandal in Europe

All rights reserved. Jewish immigrants, mostly from France, received a warm welcome when they arrived in Tel Aviv on July 17, Growing up in Paris, Esther Coscas felt safe.

Interfaith marriages are increasingly common in our more open, diverse society. Here’s how three local interfaith couples make their.

By subscribing I accept the terms of use. Politics Diaspora Opinion. Jerusalem Post Diaspora. Sammy Miller and his girlfriend Misha grew up in vastly different cultures: Sammy was raised Jewish in suburban Los Angeles , while Misha was raised Muslim in Karachi, Pakistan, moving to the United States when she was Miller also happens to be a musician — he leads , an up-and-coming poppy jazz group that sounds like a cross between the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and the Ben Folds Five.

Fortunately, in real life, the pair got past the early hurdles. Miller approached Misha when he was 16, at a Model U.

Jewish convert to Islam does pilgrimage to plain of Arafat


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